Psalm 91; Acts 24:24–25:12

My Refuge and My Fortress

91  He who dwells in athe shelter of the Most High

will abide in bthe shadow of the Almighty.

I will say1 to the Lord, My crefuge and my dfortress,

my God, in whom I etrust.

For he will deliver you from fthe snare of the fowler

and from the deadly pestilence.

He will gcover you with his pinions,

and under his hwings you will ifind refuge;

his jfaithfulness is ka shield and buckler.

lYou will not fear mthe terror of the night,

nor the arrow that flies by day,

nor the pestilence that stalks in darkness,

nor the destruction that wastes at noonday.

A thousand may fall at your side,

ten thousand at your right hand,

but it will not come near you.

You will only look with your eyes

and nsee the recompense of the wicked.

Because you have made the Lord your odwelling place

the Most High, who is my crefuge2

10  pno evil shall be allowed to befall you,

qno plague come near your tent.

11  rFor he will command his sangels concerning you

to tguard you in all your ways.

12  On their hands they will bear you up,

lest you ustrike your foot against a stone.

13  You will tread on vthe lion and the wadder;

the young lion and xthe serpent you will ytrample underfoot.

14  Because he zholds fast to me in love, I will deliver him;

I will protect him, because he aknows my name.

15  When he bcalls to me, I will answer him;

I will be with him in trouble;

I will rescue him and chonor him.

16  With dlong life I will satisfy him

and eshow him my salvation.


24 After some days Felix came with his wife Drusilla, who was Jewish, and he sent for Paul and heard him speak about afaith bin Christ Jesus. 25 And as he reasoned cabout righteousness and self-control and the coming judgment, Felix was alarmed and said, Go away for the present. dWhen I get an opportunity I will summon you. 26 At the same time he hoped ethat money would be given him by Paul. So he sent for him often and conversed with him. 27 When two years had elapsed, Felix was succeeded by Porcius fFestus. And gdesiring to do the Jews a favor, hFelix left Paul in prison.

Paul Appeals to Caesar

25 Now three days after Festus had arrived in ithe province, he went up to Jerusalem from Caesarea. And the chief priests and the principal men of the Jews jlaid out their case against Paul, and they urged him, asking as a favor against Paul1 that he summon him to Jerusalembecause kthey were planning an ambush to kill him on the way. Festus replied that Paul was being kept at Caesarea and that he himself intended to go there shortly. So, said he, let the men of authority among you go down with me, and if there is anything wrong about the man, let them bring charges against him.

After he stayed among them not more than eight or ten days, he went down to Caesarea. And the next day he took his seat on lthe tribunal and ordered Paul to be brought. When he had arrived, the Jews who had come down from Jerusalem stood around him, bringing many and serious charges against him mthat they could not prove. Paul argued in his defense, Neither nagainst othe law of the Jews, nor against the temple, nor pagainst Caesar have I committed any offense. But Festus, qwishing to do the Jews a favor, said to Paul, Do you wish to go up to Jerusalem and there be tried on these charges before me? 10 But Paul said, I am standing before Caesar's rtribunal, where I ought to be tried. To the Jews I have done no wrong, as you yourself know very well. 11 If then I am a wrongdoer and have committed anything for which I deserve to die, I do not seek to escape death. But if there is nothing to their charges against me, no one can give me up to them. sI appeal to Caesar. 12 Then Festus, when he had conferred with his council, answered, To Caesar you have appealed; to Caesar you shall go.