Proverbs 2:8–9; Proverbs 8:20; Proverbs 12:5; Proverbs 13:23; Proverbs 16:10–12; Proverbs 17:15; Proverbs 17:23; Proverbs 17:26; Proverbs 18:5; Proverbs 19:28; Proverbs 21:3; Proverbs 21:7; Proverbs 21:15; Proverbs 22:8; Proverbs 22:22; Proverbs 24:11; Proverbs 25:5; Proverbs 28:5; Proverbs 29:4; Proverbs 26–27; Proverbs 31:8–9

guarding the paths of justice

and dwatching over the way of his esaints.

fThen you will understand grighteousness and justice

and equity, every good path;


20  I walk in the way of righteousness,

in the paths of justice,


hThe thoughts of the righteous are just;

the counsels of the wicked are deceitful.


23  The fallow ground of the poor would yield much food,

but it is swept away through binjustice.


10  aAn oracle is on the lips of a king;

his mouth does not sin in judgment.

11  bA just balance and scales are the Lord's;

all the weights in the bag are his work.

12  It is an abomination to kings to do evil,

for cthe throne is established by righteousness.


15  He who hjustifies the wicked and he who icondemns the righteous

are both alike an abomination to the Lord.


23  The wicked accepts qa bribe in secret1

to rpervert the ways of justice.


26  vTo impose a fine on a righteous man is not good,

nor to strike the noble for their uprightness.


It is not good to bbe partial to1 the wicked

or to cdeprive the righteous of justice.


28  A worthless witness mocks at justice,

and the mouth of the wicked wdevours iniquity.


bTo do righteousness and justice

is more acceptable to the Lord than sacrifice.


The violence of the wicked will lsweep them away,

because they refuse to do what is just.


15  When justice is done, it is a joy to the righteous

sbut terror to evildoers.


Whoever ysows injustice will reap calamity,

and zthe rod of his fury will fail.


22  uDo not rob the poor, because he is poor,

or vcrush the afflicted at wthe gate,


11  jRescue those who are being taken away to death;

hold back those who are stumbling to the slaughter.


take away sthe wicked from the presence of the king,

and his tthrone will be established in righteousness.


Evil men ido not understand justice,

but those who seek the Lord junderstand it completely.


By justice a king hbuilds up the land,

but he who exacts gifts1 tears it down.


26  Like snow in summer or urain in harvest,

so vhonor is wnot fitting for a fool.

Like xa sparrow in its flitting, like a swallow in its flying,

ya curse that is causeless does not alight.

zA whip for the horse, a bridle for the donkey,

and aa rod for the back of fools.

bAnswer not a fool according to his folly,

lest you be like him yourself.

cAnswer a fool according to his folly,

lest he be dwise in his own eyes.

Whoever sends a message by the hand of a fool

cuts off his own feet and edrinks violence.

Like a lame man's legs, which hang useless,

is a proverb in the mouth of fools.

Like one who binds the stone in the sling

is fone who gives honor to a fool.

Like ga thorn that goes up into the hand of a drunkard

is a proverb in the mouth of fools.

10  Like an archer who wounds everyone

is one who hires a passing fool or drunkard.1

11  Like ha dog that returns to his vomit

is ia fool who repeats his folly.

12  Do you see a man who is jwise in his own eyes?

kThere is more hope for a fool than for him.

13  lThe sluggard says, There is a lion in the road!

There is a lion in the streets!

14  As a door turns on its hinges,

so does a sluggard on his bed.

15  mThe sluggard buries his hand in the dish;

it wears him out to bring it back to his mouth.

16  The sluggard is jwiser in his own eyes

nthan seven men who can answer sensibly.

17  Whoever meddles in a quarrel not his own

is like one who takes a passing dog by the ears.

18  Like a madman who throws ofirebrands, arrows, and death

19  is the man who deceives his neighbor

and says, I am only joking!

20  For lack of wood the fire goes out,

and where there is no pwhisperer, qquarreling ceases.

21  As charcoal to hot embers and wood to fire,

so is ra quarrelsome man for kindling strife.

22  sThe words of pa whisperer are like delicious morsels;

they go down into the inner parts of the body.

23  tLike the uglaze2 covering an earthen vessel

are fervent lips with an evil heart.

24  Whoever hates disguises himself with his lips

and harbors deceit in his heart;

25  vwhen he speaks graciously, believe him not,

for there are wseven abominations in his heart;

26  though his hatred be covered with deception,

his wickedness will be exposed in the assembly.

27  xWhoever digs a pit will fall into it,

and a stone will come back on him who starts it rolling.

28  A lying tongue hates its victims,

and a flattering mouth works ruin.

27  Do not boast about tomorrow,

yfor you do not know what a day may bring.

Let zanother praise you, and not your own mouth;

a stranger, and not your own lips.

A stone is heavy, and sand is weighty,

but aa fool's provocation is heavier than both.

Wrath is cruel, anger is overwhelming,

but who can stand before bjealousy?

cBetter is open rebuke

than hidden love.

Faithful are dthe wounds of a friend;

profuse are the kisses of an enemy.

One who is full loathes ehoney,

but to one who is hungry everything bitter is sweet.

Like fa bird that strays from its nest

is a man who strays from his home.

gOil and perfume make the heart glad,

and the sweetness of a friend comes from his earnest counsel.3

10  Do not forsake your friend and hyour father's friend,

and do not go to your brother's house in the day of your calamity.

iBetter is a neighbor who is near

than a brother who is far away.

11  jBe wise, kmy son, and lmake my heart glad,

that I may manswer him who reproaches me.

12  nThe prudent sees danger and hides himself,

but othe simple go on and suffer for it.

13  pTake a man's garment when he has put up security for a stranger,

and hold it in pledge when he puts up security for an adulteress.4

14  Whoever blesses his neighbor with a loud voice,

rising early in the morning,

will be counted as cursing.

15  qA continual dripping on a rainy day

and a quarrelsome wife are alike;

16  to restrain her is to restrain the wind

or to grasp5 oil in one's right hand.

17  Iron sharpens iron,

and one man sharpens another.6

18  rWhoever tends a fig tree will eat its fruit,

and he who sguards his master will be honored.

19  As in water face reflects face,

so the heart of man reflects the man.

20  tSheol and Abaddon are unever satisfied,

and vnever satisfied are the eyes of man.

21  wThe crucible is for silver, and the furnace is for gold,

and a man is tested by his praise.

22  xCrush a fool in a mortar with a pestle

along with crushed grain,

yet his folly will not depart from him.

23  yKnow well the condition of your flocks,

and ygive attention to your herds,

24  for zriches do not last forever;

and does a crown endure to all generations?

25  aWhen the grass is gone and the new growth appears

and the vegetation of the mountains is gathered,

26  bthe lambs will provide your clothing,

and the goats the price of a field.

27  bThere will be enough goats' milk for your food,

for the food of your household

and maintenance for your girls.


qOpen your mouth for the mute,

for the rights of all who are destitute.1

Open your mouth, rjudge righteously,

sdefend the rights of tthe poor and needy.